Wednesday, December 14, 2005

Jamaica

Three days in Jamaica and I haven’t blogged a thing. It’s not that there hasn’t been anything to write about. I’ve just been so damn busy that I’ve had no energy left. This customer has been keeping me hopping from sun up to sun down. We are making great progress, so that keep me going, perhaps a little longer than I should. But I’ve only got a day and a half more, so I can keep burning it. Besides, I know my coworkers burn it just as hard, so I can take it too.

So what are the things to blog about. First of all, Kingston is firmly ensconsed in the third world. I really don’t mean to be unkind in saying that. It is just so obvious when riding around town and from the airport to “New Kingston” in particular. There are many housed without roofs, garbage that looks like its been on the road side for years, and people that look like they no worked since they put out the garbage.

The Hilton hotel is very nice. I think this is one of the places that the Kingston middle class comes to live it up. I’ve seen tons of new grads and wedded couples roaming the lobby and restaurants. They all look so happy to be here. I like seeing that and I’m happy for them.

The currency is a hoot. I’m drinking my Red Stripe beer (HOORAY BEER!) right now. I’m betting it cost around $250. No, I didn’t miss the decimal, it is really $250 jamaican. Dinner was just over $3000. The exchange rate to USD is about 60:1. I feel like I’m spending like Johnny F. Chan.

It was at the end of the paragraph above that my appetizer came followed closely by my entre. None of this is too surprising since I am sitting in the sushi bar/restaurant of the hotel. Now for some odd reason, I’m feeling a scoshe more buzzed than before. It could be that the soy sauce or the Red Strip has more alcohol than I anticipated. Must be the soy sauce.

You haven’t lived until you have heard a reagge band play Christmas songs like “Chestnuts Roasting on an Open Fire.” I think this is the most English forgein country that I have ever seen. Jamaica was an English colony for hundreds of years. It makes the place very familiar in odd ways.

I love to hear the natives speak. They are so friendly to everyone. I can’t tell half the time when the native that I am with knows the person they are speaking to or not. They are so polite. It get embarssing having the door held open for me as much as it is. I won’t get used to it, but I could.

The weather is wonderful. The lows are in the high 60s and the highs are in the low 80s. The mountains are beautiful. The food is really good too. The Jamaicans are very picky about their food and they tend to eat really well. Chicken and seafood are the staples with beef very available, but expensive. Everything I have tried has be very tasty. The waiter at dinner last night took great pride as he explained that Red Stripe was “very good and world renouned.” How could I not have one or two after that.

This is a nice place, but I’ll still be happy to return home. This place in too much work. J I’ll have to see about coming back on a vacation . At this point, I would recommend it.

12 comments:

Nancy W. said...

Thats a really tough J-O-B!! I mean working in Jamaica and all....what a life!! :)

Chris said...

You need to invite me next time you go to Jamaica, I've been there once (Ocho Rios) and had a blast! Have a safe trip home bud...

Anonymous said...

" So what are the things to blog about. First of all, Kingston is firmly ensconsed in the third world. I really don’t mean to be unkind in saying that. It is just so obvious when riding around town and from the airport to “New Kingston” in particular. There are many housed without roofs, garbage that looks like its been on the road side for years, and people that look like they no worked since they put out the garbage."

Why not stop living large and buy a roof or two.AmeriKKKans are the most overconsuming,wastingPeople on the planet.Kiss your flag goodbye.

Special K said...

Why do you assume that I don't. As a matter of fact, I have bought many roofs in the third world this year. I sure hope they helped.

You'll get no argument from my about americans overconsuming. I got your little joke spelling americans with KKK. May have some truth or not, but I had a very dark-skined Jamaican tell me that skin color meant much more in Jamaica than in the states. The good jobs go to the lighter skined in Jamaica more than in the USA. I find that sad and somewhat bazaar.

As for kissing the flag goodbye, keep hoping for that and you will die unhappy.

Anonymous said...
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mama pape said...

Ahhh sweet Jamaica - I went to Negril last year and that country has gotten under my skin like no other. What an amazing place - what amazing people - what fabulous live reggae - dancing on the beach - swimming in the waters of undeveloped beaches - but mostly the openness and naturalness of the people is what impressed me most - well that and the reggae. Glad that you also enjoyed it.

SPIRITUAL GROWTH FOR A BLESSED LIFE said...

Yeah, nice of you to share your experience of the beautiful place called Jamaica. Enjoyed, but your comment of the Americans wasting time or money or both on eating the same thing they could get in any US city seems to me to be way out of their objective.

Newsandseduction said...

Jamaica very hot now?

Mags said...

I just have to say, I am SO jealous. I wish my work sent me to Jamaica...

besophoto said...

i've enjoyed reading your jamaican posts. i'll be going there this week for new year's. i've never been and i'm really excited. i'm hoping to drive into kingston and take some photographs. i'm also from a third world country and i can't go to any country and not actually see their reality - i find that hypocritical.

lauren said...

i thinku should put in some pictures check out my site www.dogpics2.blogspot.com

YAZMAR said...

It must be nice to be in Jamaica